Is there such a thing as waiting too long to use hospice?

Is there such a thing as waiting too long to use hospice?

Sharing a ConsumerReports.com article about “how waiting too long to use hospice care can make suffering at end-of-life worse.”

According to the article:
Many people who are near the end of life wait too long to enter hospice care, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

In hospice care, attempts to cure a disease are usually replaced with treatments solely for pain and suffering, delivered by a specialized team. It usually includes medical and nursing care, counseling and social services, and it can be given at home, in a nursing home or in a hospital facility.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE

Celebrating National Case Management Week

“It’s National Case Management week! This year’s ACMA theme, Case Management: Setting New Standards For Care was selected to emphasize the impact professionals in case management make every day. ACMA hopes you will celebrate NCMW 19 and recognize the dedication, compassion and patient care outcomes achieved by case managers in your organization. Across all care settings, case managers are making the difference! ACMA encourages you to use this week to commend your team and recognize the importance of the case management professionals who dedicate their careers to patients and healthcare organizations.” Celebrate your #casemanagementteam during National Case Management Week! #NCMW@TheACMA

 

Happy Labor Day!

Summer’s final fling has arrived in the form of Labor Day! On the first Monday of every September, we take the day off to celebrate Labor Day and reflect on the American worker’s contributions to our country. Today, we join many others in wishing fellow workers a ‘Happy Labor Day’ !

Did you ever wonder what’s behind Labor Day and how it earned its place as a federal holiday? Enjoy a fun read about this by clicking the link below to gain more knowledge about the history, importance and traditions of Labor Day.

“National Today” Labor Day 2019 – Everything You Need to Know

Coping with Loss

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The stages of mourning and grief are universal and are experienced by people from all walks of life. Mourning occurs in response to an individual’s own terminal illness, the loss of a close relationship, or to the death of a valued being, human or animal.

Every person grieves differently, and typically experience five stages of normal grief. Many do not experience the stages in order. In Dr. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross book, “On Death and Dying” she identified the stages as denial and isolation, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance. (source: Elisabeth Kübler-Ross Foundation.)

Loved ones that are terminally ill or aging appear to go through a final period of withdrawal. Those coping with loss spend different lengths of time working through each step and express each stage with different levels of intensity.

Bristol Hospice is here to support. Our trained volunteers, Chaplains and Bereavement Counselors provide grief counseling and support groups for those who have experienced loss.

Contact us to learn how our experts provide support for those coping with loss and grief.

Bristol Hospice Thanks you.

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At Bristol Hospice ~California, we are graciously committed to our mission that all patients and families entrusted to our care will be treated with the highest level of compassion, respect, and quality of care. Thank you for the wonderful comments from those we serve.

Here are just a few of the kinds words we receive.

“I am grateful for the help I received from your team and the support I received at this time. I want to thank each and everyone for the good care and, also, the chaplain. They all made it easier at this time for me. Thank you.”

Hospice Care. A Model for Quality, Compassionate Care.

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It is not surprising that most people associate hospice with cancer. In the mid-1970s when hospice came to the U.S., most hospice patients had cancer. Today, more than half of hospice patients in the U.S. have other illnesses for which they are medically eligible for hospice services, such as late-stage heart, lung or kidney disease, and advanced Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. (source: Hospice Foundation of America). Hospice care is covered under Medicare, Medicaid, VA and most insurance plans cover hospice services.

Hospice is not a place, because Hospice is a plan of care. Patients may receive Hospice services wherever they call home, which may be a private residence or that of a loved one, hospital, assisted living center, or nursing home.

“You matter because you are you, and you matter to the last moment of your life.”
~Dame Cicely Saunders, founder of modern hospice.

Hospice is considered to be the model for quality, compassionate care for people facing a life-limiting illness or injury. Hospice care involves a team-oriented approach to expert medical care, pain management, and emotional and spiritual support expressly tailored to the patient’s needs and wishes. Support is provided to the patient’s loved ones as well.  At the center of hospice and palliative care is the belief that each of us has the right to die pain-free and with dignity, and that our families will receive the necessary support to allow us to do so.

Typically, in order to receive hospice services:

  • A hospice physician and a second physician (often the individual’s attending physician or specialist) must certify that the patient meets specific medical eligibility criteria;
  • The patient’s life expectancy is 6 months or less if the illness, disease or condition

Click here for resources for end-of-life caregiving resources from Hospice Foundation of America. Or for further information from our Hospice experts, contact us.

Celebrate Those at the Heart of Caring

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June 9 – 16 is the 39th Annual National Nursing Assistants’ Week, celebrating the vital supporting role Nursing Assistants play in the delivery of quality care. It is reported that each day, more than 4.5 million caregivers provide hands-on care to our nation’s frail, elderly, or chronically challenged citizens. Visit cna-network.org to find out how you can thank Nursing Assistants this week.

This week especially, Bristol Hospice would like to commend all of the CNAs who provide comfort, care and support of those receiving hospice services. Thank you for all you do for Bristol Hospice’s patients and families. You are at the heart of caring!

National Safety Month – Are You Prepared?

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June is National Safety Month, reminding us of the importance of being prepared, educated and understand the leading causes of preventable injuries. Visit NSC.org to learn more.

As caregivers, it is important to be on the watch for unforeseen hazards around the home. Consider the following:

1. Safe Disposal of Medications: Medicines play an important role in treating many conditions and diseases, especially when receiving hospice services. When they are no longer needed, it is important to dispose of them properly to help reduce harm from accidental exposure or intentional misuse. Consider safely disposing of medications through drug take-back programs, mail-back programs or collection receptacles. Visit the DEA’s website for more information about drug disposal, National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day events and to locate a DEA-authorized collector in your area. You may also call the DEA Office of Diversion Control’s Registration Call Center at 1-800-882-9539 to find an authorized collector in your community.

2. Prevent Falls: The CDC reports that each year, one in every three adults ages 65 or older falls and 2 million are treated in emergency departments for fall-related injuries. To prevent falls, consider the following:

  • Remove things you can trip over from stairs and places where you walk.
  • Install handrails and lights on all staircases and grab bars in bathrooms.
  • Remove or secure small throw rugs.
  • Keep items you use often in cabinets you can reach easily without using a step stool.
  • Improve the lighting in your home.

3. Be Emergency Ready: The best way to be ready for the possibility of a public health emergency such as a natural disaster, act of terrorism, or disease outbreak is to have a plan. You can take steps now to help you prepare for an emergency and cope if an emergency happens. The CDC recommends it is important to know how you will contact family members and friends and understand the special steps you will take in different types of emergency situations. Click here to view information from the CDC to help you be prepared!

We are graciously committed to serving

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Hospice care, centers on the patient and family. The goal of the professionals at Bristol Hospice is to empower to make choices regarding care and assistance. The team serves as an advocate, helping to access the information and resources needed during this very challenging time.

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“The Bristol Hospice team were always loving, caring, and most importantly, gentle with my sister. They were an excellent support system to me. I could not have done this without them.”
~ A surviving family member

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Thank you for the opportunity to serve with the highest level of compassion, respect and quality of care. Contact us to learn more about our services.